A place where I can chronicle my family's journey through cancer. A place where WE can discuss our concerns. A place where WE can inspire each other. A place for hope.

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

REBIRTH

Well, today is the big day! Today is the day that we've all been working and waiting for! Today is the day mama bear gets her stem cells back a.k.a Day 00. A lot of people refer to this day as their second birthday because you are receiving pure pluripotent stem cells (able to turn into RBCs, WBCs, etc.). That means that, somewhere down the road, my mom will have to re-receive her immunization shots (just like a child) because the "information" from her last vaccinations were not stored in these stem cells' memories. So, HAPPY BIRTHDAY mama!

11:20am
Stem cells are being re-introduced!
Beautiful Stem Cell Warriors
Stem Cell Warriors marching off to the front
11:25am

I will never be able to eat corn again...

Why, you ask?

WELL. Before the stem cells were infused back into the motherland, they were stored in a type of preservative. Now, as they are put back into my mom, her body starts to take up the stem cells and rid itself of anything else that is foreign a.k.a the preservative. This is done purely through the natural process of perspiration (not sweating, but just...diffusing out). As my mom exhales and her body perspires, the preservative, which has a HEAVY "creamed corn" scent, is excreted. At first, it wasn't that bad. But now, holy guac.

It. Is. THICK! I may need to go for a walk/breather so I don't pass out. Needless to say, corn will never taste the same again (if I can work myself to eating it again).

11:35am

Months of stress and anxiety. Weeks of work up (tests, medication, etc.). A day and a half for harvesting. All leading up to this critical point, the ACTUAL transplant itself. This grand and momentous occasion.

It took 15 minutes.

I must admit, for all the work that you put into this procedure, the transplant, itself, is QUITE anti-climatic. It is such an important procedure, a procedure that can make the difference between life and death really, that you expect something very.. I dunno, BIG! But just as fast as they nurses were in, they were out. I barely had a chance to take a picture because the stem cells were being infused back so fast. You almost expect something a little more intense. But, like I said before, perhaps great things come in small, humble packages. And that's exactly what this transplant was.

I was really hoping to take my mom out on pass (you don't start to feel the side-effects for about 3-4 days afterwards), but we are apparently a part of this new study (mama bear is only the second person to have gone through this at our hospital) where patients are given Velcade (chemo) before and after the transplant. Hopefully it will mean a long and lasting remission. Has anyone heard of this before? So that means we can't take her today after she's completed her hydration because she's getting her Velcade tomorrow. But afterwards, we should be good to go. I think she needs to get out of the hospital. Aside from the absolute STUFFINESS of this place, you feel like you're bunking in (as our dear friend, Carol, said) an A&W a.k.a Brown, yellow or Brown, orange color schemes. Let me tell you, whoever the hospital hired as their interior designer for this ward...Fail. Unless you have some weird fantasy to live in an A&W or something...

Sent from my BlackBerry device on the Rogers Wireless Network

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